Natural Hazards Research Platform Programme Summary

This report examines the design, testing and refining of the Build Back Better Tool for reporting on disaster recovery as recovery develops. The report is part of the analysis under the research project, Building to Recovery (2015-2019), funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment through the Natural Hazards Research Platform (NHRP). The research programme built on earlier work …

Post-Conflict Recovery & Resilience Research Hub

Our ‘Build Back Better’ family is going towards the Middle East. We’re happy to be establishing a research hub in partnership with ‘JonZ for Sustainable Development’, an initiative established in 2017 by the youth to be as a bridge connecting New Zealand with the East aiming to contribute to the development of communities. The ‘Post-Conflict Recovery & Resilience Research Hub’ …

BOOK OUT NOW!!!!!!!!! Resilient Post Disaster Recovery through Building Back Better

“Building Back Better” (BBB) has been a popular slogan in disaster recovery efforts around the world, including the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, the 2009 Samoan Tsunami, the 2010 Haiti Earthquake and the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. BBB has recently been identified as one of four priorities of action for disaster risk reduction globally in the next 15 years by …

New Zealand: Operationalising resilience: A heuristic framework for analysis

By Professor Iain White, Professor Bruce Glavovic, Dr Judy Lawrence and Dr Gail Adams-Hutcheson The question of how to build the resilience of places and organisations is attracting great interest. However, the term resilience is defined in diverse and contested ways. This raises important questions around how resilience is understood, what it is designed to achieve, and how this may translate …

Sendai Framework anniversary: reporting underway

Three years after the adoption of a global plan to reduce disaster losses 148 countries have now committed to report systematically on their disaster losses including deaths, numbers of people affected, economic losses and damage to critical infrastructure including public utilities. Best estimates are that disasters cost the global economy US$520 billion annually while pushing 26 million people into poverty …

To prevent disasters, you must count your losses

This month sees the beginning of a major effort by all U.N. member states to systematically collect data on everyday losses experienced as a result of natural or man-made hazards, as well as related environmental, technological and biological hazards and risks. While we often have reliable estimates for mortality and numbers of people affected by disasters, until now too few …

Christchurch earthquake anniversary: A day for reflection

It’s easy to forget while living our busy everyday lives what the important things really are. Until something we have absolutely no control over gives us a gentle, or not so gentle, reminder we’re certainly not in charge. Mother Nature flexed her muscles across New Zealand as Cyclone Gita took hold. Luckily we were exposed to little more than some …

Working with refugees to build disaster resilience

Building a life in a new country is daunting as it is, but when faced with a natural disaster, it can also be dangerous. University of Wollongong PhD student Shefali Juneja Lakhina is working with refugee families across the Illawarra to understand how they learn about and prepare for natural hazards, such as bushfires, storms and flash flooding. “It is …

Nepal: Building Kathmandu back better

By Andy McElroy INCHEON – Every day when Purusotam Shakya steps into his office in the heart of Kathmandu, Nepal’s bustling capital city, three words leap to the front of his mind: “Build Back Better”. Mr. Shakya is the Director of Kathmandu Metropolitan City’s Disaster Management Department, and relishes his key role in the ongoing reconstruction of the city after …

2018: Are we ready to commit to building resilient infrastructure?

Just ahead of this year’s anniversary of the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004, I visited the Tsunami Honganji Vihara site in Sri Lanka where upwards of 2,000 people died when their train was destroyed by the force of the waves. Shortly after my visit, Sri Lanka was faced with an unusually large tropical cyclone that pummeled the capital of Colombo, …

2017: the year in extreme weather

By Andrew King, Climate Extremes Research Fellow, University of Melbourne Overall 2017 will be the warmest non-El Niño year on record globally, and over the past 12 months we have seen plenty of extreme weather, both here in Australia and across the world. Here I’ll round up some of this year’s wild weather, and look forward to 2018 to see what’s around …

India: Can Chennai’s city disaster plan ensure resilient future?

Reports aout Cyclone Ockhi are pouring in. The severe storm has claimed at least 16 people in South Tamil Nadu and Kerala as of December 1. Another potential cyclone formation is gathering momentum near the Andamans, which may reach Indian East Coast on late Monday. The beginning of December, unwillingly, brings the traumaticmemory of 2015 floods, followed by the 2016 …